Subscribe to Newsletter
Monthly Newsletter: Join more than 3,000 African literature enthusiasts!
Subscribe for African literature news, and receive a free copy of our "Guide to African Novels."

Yewande Omotoso. Image from Mail and Guardian.

South Africa-based Nigerian novelist Yewande Omotoso has been shortlisted for the 2018 International Dublin Literary Award, for her second novel The Woman Next Door. The Award’s longlist, released in November of last year, included four other Africans: Cameroun’s Imbolo Mbue for Behold the Dreamers, Ghana’s Yaa Gyasi for Homegoing, and South Africans Nthikeng Mohlele for Pleasure and Mohale Mashigo for The YearningThe 2017 Award went to Angola’s Jose Eduardo Agualusa for A General Theory of Oblivion.

Formerly the IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, the International Dublin Literary Award was founded in 1995 and, at €100,000, is the richest for a single book of fiction published in English. Sponsored by Dublin City Council, it is managed by Dublin City Libraries, in line with Dublin’s 2010 designation as a UNESCO City of Literature. For each prize, libraries in major cities worldwide make nominations. If the book has been translated the author receives €75,000 and the translator receives €25,000.

Image from NPR.

Published by Chatto & Windus in 2016, Yewande Omotoso’s The Woman Next Door had been longlisted for the 2017 Women’s Prize for Fiction, and was a finalist for  2017 University of Johannesburg Main Prize, the 2017 Barry Ronge Fiction Prize, and the 2017 Aidoo-Snyder Book Prize. Here’s a description on Amazon.

Hortensia James and Marion Agostino are neighbours. One is black, one white. Both are successful women with impressive careers. Both have recently been widowed. And both are sworn enemies, sharing hedge and hostility and pruning both with a vim and zeal that belies the fact that they are over eighty.

But one day an unforeseen event forces the women together. And gradually the bickering and sniping softens into lively debate, and from there into memories shared. But could these sparks of connection ever transform into friendship? Or is it too late to expect these two to change?

Here are the other nine shortlisted novels:

  • Baba Dunja’s Last Love by Alina Bronsky (Ukrainian/German) Translated from the German by Tim Mohr. Published by Europa Editions.
  • The Transmigration of Bodies by Yuri Herrera (Mexican) Translated from the Spanish by Lisa Dillman. Published by And Other Stories.
  • The Unseen by Roy Jacobsen (Norwegian) Translated from Norwegian by Don Bartlett & Don Shaw. Published by MacLehose Press.
  • Human Acts by Han Kang (South Korean) Translated from Korean by Deborah Smith. Published by Portobello Books and Random House, USA.
  • The Lesser Bohemians by Eimear McBride (Irish) Published by Faber & Faber.
  • Solar Bones by Mike McCormack (Irish) Published by Tramp Press.
  • Distant Light by Antonio Moresco (Italian) Translated from Italian by Richard Dixon. Published by Archipelago Books.
  • Ladivine by Marie Ndiaye (French) Translated from French by Jordan Stump. Published by MacLehose Press.
  • The Woman Next Door by Yewande Omotoso (South African/Nigerian/Barbadian) Published by Chatto & Windus.
  • My Name is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout (American) Published by Penguin, UK

Congratulations to Yewande Omotoso.

AN AFRICAN HISTORY OF THE INTERNATIONAL DUBLIN LITERARY AWARD

The first African winner of the International Dublin Literary Award is Morocco’s Tahar Ben Jelloun in 2004, for his novel This Blinding Absence of Light. In 2005, South Africa’s Diane Awerbuck made the shortlist for her novel Gardening at Night. In 2006, there were two Africans: Nigeria’s Chris Abani for GraceLand and Algeria’s Yasmina Khadra for The Swallows of Kabul. In 2007, J.M. Coetzee, then of South Africa, was chosen for Slow Man.

In 2008, Yasmine Khadra made a return with The Attack. In 2012, it was Sierra Leonean-Scottish Aminatta Forna for The Memory of Love. In 2015, the longlist had Chimamanda Adichie for Americanah, Aminatta Forna again for The Hired Man, Zimbabwe’s NoViolet Bulawayo for We Need New Names, and Morocco’s Mahi Binebine for Horses of God, with Adichie and Binebine reaching the shortlist. In 2016, the shortlist had Rwanda’s Scholastique Mukasonga for Our Lady of the Nile.

Alongside 2017 winner Agualusa on the ten-writer shortlist were Nigeria’s Chinelo Okparanta for Under the Udala Trees and his close friend Mozambique’s Mia Couto for Confession of the Lioness. They had been chosen from a longlist of 147 books, which included Nigeria’s Chigozie Obioma for The Fishermen and Algeria’s Kamel Daoud for The Meursault Investigation.

Tags: , ,

About Otosirieze Obi-Young

View all posts by Otosirieze Obi-Young
Otosirieze Obi-Young is a writer, an academic, and Deputy Editor of Brittle Paper. His fiction has appeared in The Threepenny Review ("Mulumba," 2016), Transition ("A Tenderer Blessing," 2015), and in an anthology of the Gerald Kraak Award for which he was shortlisted ("You Sing of a Longing," 2017). His work has further been shortlisted for the Miles Morland Writing Scholarship in 2016 and a Pushcart Prize in 2015. He attended the 2018 Miles Morland Foundation Creative Writing Workshop. He is the curator of the ART NAIJA SERIES, a sequence of themed e-anthologies of writing and visual art exploring different aspects of Nigerianness. The first, ENTER NAIJA: THE BOOK OF PLACES (October, 2016), focuses on cities in Nigeria. The second, WORK NAIJA: THE BOOK OF VOCATIONS (June, 2017), focuses on professions in Nigeria. He studied History and Literature at the University of Nigeria, Nsukka, is currently completing a postgraduate programme in African Studies and Pop Culture, and teaches English at Godfrey Okoye University, Enugu. He has completed a collection of short stories, You Sing of a Longing, and is working on a novel. He is represented by David Godwin Associates literary agency. When bored, he just Googles Rihanna.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

Monthly Newsletter!

Subscribe for African literature news, and receive a free copy of our
"Guide to African Novels."

Archives

New Collection of Plays Shines Light on African Women Playwright

Contemporary Plays by African Women

There are many literary projects making a difference in the way we read and talk about African literature. One of […]

Chibundu Onuzo is Coming to America! | See All the Dates

chibundu onuzo

US-based fans of Chibundu Onuzo are in luck. Her critically acclaimed second novel Welcome to Lagos will officially be released in […]

“I Pushed His Hand Away…Gently”: Chimamanda Adichie on Being Sexually Harassed at 17

adichie dior 2

At the Stockholm Forum on Gender Equality, held 15-17 April, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie talked about “a powerful man in the […]

Poet Nacima Qorane Sentenced to Jail in Somaliland for Advocating for a Reunified Somalia

nacima qorane

A court in the self-declared Republic of Somaliland has sentenced poet Nacima Qorane to three years in jail for her […]

Brittle Paper Deputy Editor Otosirieze Obi-Young Signs with Booker Prize-Famed Literary Agency

otosirieze obi-young

Brittle Paper’s Deputy Editor Otosirieze Obi-young has joined the client list of David Godwin Associates (DGA), the same agency representing […]

Agwaetiti Obiụtọ | Watch the Trailer of Onyeka Nwelue’s Riveting New Film

onyeka nwelue - bella naija

Nigerian writer Onyeka Nwelue has a new film out. Agwaetiti Obiụtọ, an Igbo language feature, is a satire focused on the lives […]

Thanks for signing up!

Never miss out on new posts. Subscribe to a digest, too:

No thanks, I only want the monthly newsletter.