Subscribe to Newsletter
Monthly Newsletter: Join more than 5,000 African literature enthusiasts!
Subscribe for African literature news, and receive a free copy of our "Guide to African Novels."

Tade Thompson’s Rosewater. Image from While Reading and Walking.

The Nigerian writer and psychiatrist Tade Thompson has won the 2019 Arthur C Clarke Award, the UK’s premier honour for science fiction, for his Nommo Award-winning novel Rosewater, the first in his Wormwood Trilogy set in 2066 Africa invaded by aliens. The announcement was made at the prize ceremony on Wednesday night at Foyles Bookshop, London, where Thompson received a trophy and £2,019, a cash prize which changes to match the announcement year. This year’s prize received the highest number of entries yet—124 novels.

“Alien invasion is always a political subject,” the chair of the judges Andrew M Butler said, “and Tade Thompson. . . expertly explores the nature of the alien, global power structures and pervasive technologies with a winning combination of science fictional invention, gritty plotting and sly wit.”

Thompson’s Wormwood Trilogy is completed by The Rosewater Insurrection (2019) and the forthcoming The Rosewater Redemption (2019). His other books include the novel Making Wolf (2015) and the novellas The Murder of Molly Southbourne (2017) and The Survival of Molly Southbourne (2019), which has been optioned for screen adaptation. He is a recipient of a Kitschies Golden Tentacle Award winner, and a finalist for a John W. Campbell Award, the Shirley Jackson Award, and the British Science Fiction Award. Last year, he pushed a conversation with his essay, “Please Stop Talking About the ‘Rise’ of African Science Fiction.”

Tade Thompson. Image from The Guardian.

Published in 2016 by Orbit Books, here is a description of Rosewater from Amazon:

Between meeting a boy who bursts into flames, alien floaters that want to devour him, and a butterfly woman who he has sex with when he enters the xenosphere, Kaaro’s life is far from the simple one he wants. But he left simple behind a long time ago when he was caught stealing and nearly killed by an angry mob. Now he works for a government agency called Section 45, and they want him to find a woman known as Bicycle Girl.

An alien entity lives beneath the ground, forming a biodome around which the city of Rosewater thrives. The citizens of Rosewater are enamored by the dome, hoping for a chance to meet the beings within or possibly be invited to come in themselves. But Kaaro isn’t so enamored. He was in the biodome at one point and decided to leave it behind. When something begins killing off other sensitives like himself, Kaaro defies Section 45 to search for an answer, facing his past, and comes to a realization about a horrifying future.

Rosewater was chosen from a shortlist that included the Iraqi novelist Ahmed Saadawi’s Frankenstein in Baghdad, the British author Aliya Whiteley’s The Loosening Skin, the American author Sue Burke’s Semiosis, the Swedish artist Simon Stålenhag’s illustrated novel The Electric State, and the American author Yoon Ha Lee’s Revenant Gun.

Previous winners of the Arthur C Clarke Award, now in its 33rd year, include Margaret Atwood, Geoff Ryman, Amitav Ghosh, Lauren Beukes, and Colson Whitehead.

Brittle Paper congratulates Tade Thompson.

Buy Rosewater HERE.

Tags: , , ,

About Otosirieze Obi-Young

View all posts by Otosirieze Obi-Young
Otosirieze Obi-Young is a writer, journalist, & Deputy Editor of Brittle Paper. The recipient of the inaugural The Future Awards Prize for Literature in 2019, he is a judge for The Gerald Kraak Prize and was a judge for The Morland Writing Scholarship in 2019. He is Nonfiction Editor at 14, Nigeria’s first queer art collective, which has published volumes including We Are Flowers (2017) and The Inward Gaze (2018). He is Curator at The Art Naija Series, a sequence of e-anthologies of writing and visual art focusing on different aspects of Nigerianness, including Enter Naija: The Book of Places (2016), which explores cities, and Work Naija: The Book of Vocations (2017), which explores professions. His work in queer equality advocacy in literature has been profiled in Literary Hub. His fiction has appeared in The Threepenny Review and Transition. He has completed a collection of short stories, You Sing of a Longing, is working on a novel, and is represented by David Godwin Associates literary agency. He has an M.A. in African Studies and a combined honours B.A. in History & International Studies/English & Literary Studies, both from the University of Nigeria, Nsukka. He taught English in a private Nigerian university. Find him at otosirieze.com, where he accepts writing and editing offers, or on Instagram or Twitter: @otosirieze. When bored, he Googles Rihanna.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Welcome to Brittle Paper, your go-to site for African writing and literary culture. We bring you all the latest news and juicy updates on publications, authors, events, prizes, and lifestyle. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram (@brittlepaper) and sign up for our "I love African Literature" newsletter.

Monthly Newsletter!

Subscribe for African literature news, and receive a free copy of our
"Guide to African Novels."

Archives

Nnedi Okorafor’s LaGuardia Wins 2020 Hugo Award for Best Graphic Story or Comic

Nnedi Okorafor's LaGuardia Wins 2020 Hugo Award for Best Graphic Story or Comic (3)

Nigeria’s Nnedi Okorafor is on a roll! Barely two weeks since bagging an Eisner Award, Okarafor wins the coveted Hugo […]

Ugandan Novelist Jennifer Makumbi on All-Female Short Story Prize Longlist

Jennifer Makumbi on All-Female Short Story Prize Longlist

Celebrated Ugandan author Jennifer Makumbi is on the longlist of the 2020 Edge Hill Short Story Prize for her debut […]

Is Oedipus Rex a Form of Detective Fiction? — Watch Episode 5 of Prof. Ato Quayson’s Vlog

Is Oedipus Rex a Form of Detective Fiction_ --- Watch Episode 5 of Prof. Ato Quayson's Vlog

The fifth episode of Professor Ato Quayson’s vlog Critic.Reading.Writing is up! As the literary vlog enters its fifth week, Quayson […]

Wole Soyinka Writes Letter of Solidarity for Detained Humanist Mubarak Bala

Soyinka2

Nobel Laureate Wole Soyinka has never hesitated to speak out in the face of injustice. He recently penned a letter […]

Kenyan Filmmaker Wanuri Kahiu and Ghanaian American Playwright Jocelyn Bioh Collaborating on a Disney+ Project

once on this island wanuri kahiu joselyn bioh (1)

Wanuri Kahiu will direct the Disney+ film adaptation of the Broadway musical, Once on This Island, reports Hollywood Reporter. Ghanaian-American […]

Treasure is a New Novella by Oyinkan Braithwaite

Braithwaite3

Calling all fans of My Sister, the Serial Killer! Oyinkan Braithwaite has a new novella out. Titled Treasure, the book […]

Thanks for signing up!

Never miss out on new posts. Subscribe to a digest, too:

No thanks, I only want the monthly newsletter.