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Tag Archives: African writers

The Impossibly Dapper Novelist: A Look at Alain Mabanckou’s Style File

From Chimamanda Adichie’s widely-publicized made-in-Nigeria wardrobe to Teju Cole’s Ikire Jones scarves to Prof Ato Quayson’s fedora hats, fashion and style have become a new mode of self-expression among African literary figures. They effortlessly blend literary success and a love for style. In so doing, these writers have transformed the idea of the public intellectual into […]

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Shortlist Announced for the 2016 Morland Writing Scholarship

Three months ago, we announced that The Miles Morland Foundation was accepting applications for a writer’s scholarship. The shortlist for the prestigious Morland Writing Scholarship is finally here, and there are few surprises. Of the 500 applications received from 37 countries, only 22 names representing 7 countries made the shortlist. In about two weeks, this […]

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African Literature on Instagram Vol. 8 | Chibundo Onuzo’s Style File

Chibundu Onuzo recently announced the forthcoming release of her new book. It’s titled Welcome to Lagos. The cover is gorgeous. We even shared it here last week. [click here if you missed it.] All that is great news, but that’s not what we want to talk about this Friday afternoon. How about the fact that […]

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African Writer Style Guide | 12 Times African Writers Gave Us Major Hair Goals

  Even before Chimamanda Adichie first became publicly vocal about the political implications of natural hair, black women across the world have been ditching chemical relaxers to embrace natural or natural-looking hair and finding beauty in their own skin. African writers in particular are no exception to this trend. In fact chances are that your favorite […]

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Our Ali: African Writers Reflect on Icon Muhammad Ali’s Legacy

Muhammad Ali is the boxing legend who shook his generation and changed what it meant to be black, bold and fearless. After a three decade-long battle with Parkinson’s disease, he passed away on Friday at the age of 74. Since then, people have used social media platforms to share tweets, images and videos mourning his loss and celebrating […]

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Dear Ms. Paper: How Do I Stop Hating on My Successful (African Writer) Friend

Dear Ms. Paper: One of writer friends just made the long list of a prestigious literary prize. We both live in Lagos and have been friends for years now. When she told me about the longlist, I tried to sound excited. I even posted congratulatory messages on social media. But, if I have to be honest to myself, […]

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African Writers on Writing | Lauren Beukes Likens Writing to a Virus, an Infection, and a Parasite

There are aspiring African writers out there working hard to produce good work. To help them get ahead in the literary hustle, we  keep an eye out for words of encouragement and advice from successful African authors. This edition of the “African Writers on Writing” series comes straight out of South Africa where all sorts of interesting […]

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African Writers on Writing | Yvonne Owuor on Entering the Zone

Yvonne Owuor is the author of Dust, a lyrical novel about loss and mourning. She was born in Kenya and won the Caine Prize for African Writing in 2003. With stern discipline, I rise with the first bird, salute the dawn, have a healthy breakfast of fruits. [I] wander over to my faux-oak desk, tap the […]

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Demons in the Villa | Excerpt from Ebenezer Obadare’s Pentecostal Republic

pentecostal republics ebenezer obadare

Pentecostal Republic takes a hard look at the influence of pentecostalism in Nigerian politics. Prof. Obadare is a sociologist, who […]

Yasmin Belkhyr, Romeo Oriogun, Liyou Libsekal, JK Anowe Featured in Forthcoming 20.35 Africa Anthology Guest-Edited by Gbenga Adesina and Safia Elhillo

20.35 africa contributors

In February, we announced a call for submissions for a new poetry project. The anthology, 20.35 Africa: An Anthology of Contemporary Poetry, […]

On Black and Arab Identities: Safia Elhillo’s Arab American Book Awards Acceptance Speech

Safia Elhillo - tcb book club (2)

Safia Elhillo has won the 2018 Arab American Book Award, also known as the George Ellenbogen Poetry Award, for her […]

Attend the Second Edition of the Write with Style Workshop with Oris Aigbokhaevbolo

Oris Aigbokhaevbolo (2)

Following the first edition of the Write With Style Workshop, the award-winning writer, critic, and journalist Oris Aigbokhaevbolo is hosting […]

Ngugi’s Novel, Matigari, Is Being Adapted to Film by Nollywood Director Kunle Afolayan

Kenyan author Ngugi wa ThiongÕo, Distinguished Professor of English and comparative literature at UC Irvine, is on the short list for the 2010 Nobel Prize in literature, for xxx(add phrase or blurb here from award announcement; 

Chancellor quote? Christine writing and getting approved quote).

Ngugi, whose name is pronounced ÒGoogyÓ and means Òwork,Ó is a prolific writer of novels, plays, essays and childrenÕs literature. Many of these have skewered the harsh sociopolitical conditions of post-Colonial Kenya, where he was born, imprisoned by the government and forced into exile.

His recent works have been among his most highly acclaimed and include what some consider his finest novel, ÒMurogi wa KagogoÓ (ÒWizard of the CrowÓ), a sweeping 2006 satire about globalization that he wrote in his native Gikuyu language. In his 2009 book ÒSomething Torn & New: An African Renaissance,Ó Ngugi argues that a resurgence of African languages is necessary to the restoration of African wholeness.

ÒI use the novel form to explore issues of wealth, power and values in society and how their production and organization in society impinge on the quality of a peopleÕs spiritual life,Ó he has said.

Ngugi wa Thiong’o’s 1987 novel Matigari is being adapted to film by Nollywood director Kunle Afolayan in a co-production with yet undisclosed Kenyan […]

Safia Elhillo Makes a Fashion Statement at the Arab American Book Awards

Safia Elhillo - tcb book club (2)

From Taiye Selasi’s dreamy designer collections and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s flayed sleeves and Dior collaboration to Alain Mabanckou’s dapper suits […]

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