being-female-in-nigeria

Thanks to Chimamanda Adichie’s feminist booklet, an Abuja-based book club sent the hashtag #BeingFemaleInNigeria on a trending spike yesterday. That beautiful moment when you realize that books can change the world!

Okay maybe not change the world but at least get people talking about things that truly matter—like raising awareness about sexism in Nigerian society.

Here is how the story goes, as told by Buzzfeed.

It all started as a book club meeting led by a woman named Florence Warmate. The group of about 15 women met to discuss Adichie’s purse-size book on feminism, “We Should All Be Feminists.” They ended up ended up spending a good bit of their time sharing their challenges as women living in Nigeria.

“We were discussing the book, started talking about our own experiences and thought we should take this to a larger audience,” Warmate tells Buzzfeed who spoke to her on the phone.

At lunch break the following day, they put the hashtag, #BeingFemaleInNigeria, in circulation and asked women to speak out about their experiences. The response was overwhelming.

The hashtag has since been used over 17,000 times on Twitter by women and men across the country to comment on sexism in everyday Nigerian life.

This is the kind of moment that an author lives for—when your work inspires people to think deeply about the need for change. Adichie must be delighted.

Here are some of the tweets:

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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  1. #BeingFemaleInNigeria: book club ignite everyday sexism debate | My blog - 2015/07/01

    […] Nigeria’s Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s 58-page feminist pamphlet provided the inspiration for a nationwide women’s rights debate. Brittle Paper report […]

  2. #BeingFemaleInNigeria: book club ignite everyday sexism debate | infopunk.org - 2015/07/01

    […] Nigeria’s Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s 58-page feminist pamphlet provided the inspiration for a nationwide women’s rights debate. Brittle Paper report […]

  3. #BeingFemaleInNigeria: book club ignites everyday sexism debate – The Guardian | News One | Breaking News | Latest News - 2015/07/01

    […] version of this write-up originally appeared on Brittle Paper, section of the Guardian Africa […]

  4. #BeingFemaleInNigeria: book club ignites everyday sexism debate | infopunk.org - 2015/07/01

    […] Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s 58-page feminist pamphlet provided the inspiration for a women’s rights debate. Brittle Paper reports […]

  5. This just in…#WhoIsBurningBlackChurches, #BeingFemaleinNigeria, #BP, and more. | wellhellobetty - 2015/07/02

    […] a hastag you need to check out now. Chimamanda Adichie made a feminist booklet that spurred an Abuja-based book club to create the hashtag. The stories being shared are vital. Ignore the graphics and videos from aid organizations, and see […]

  6. #BeingFemaleInNigeria: book club ignites everyday sexism debate | IBNMoney Europe EU - 2015/07/04

    […] Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s 58-page feminist pamphlet provided the inspiration for a women’s rights debate. Brittle Paper reports […]

  7. | Africans on Twitter – 15 Hashtags That Defined 2015 (#AOT2015)Circumspecte - 2016/01/04

    […] characters and African Twitter responded overwhelmingly. Inspired by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s 2014 pocket-sized book: ‘We Should All Be Feminists’, Florence Warmate and her group sparked a conversation across the […]

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I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

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