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Kenyan politician Martha Karua has been compared to Brienne of Tarth from Game of Thrones.

Two weeks before Kenya votes for a new president, online bookseller and blogger William Magunga has caused wild excitement by comparing Kenyan politicians to Game of Thrones characters on Facebook. The photo series is titled “Game of Thrones in Kenya.” The characters compared include Cersei Lannister, Ned Stark, Little Finger, Tywin Lannister, Robert Baratheon, Brienne of Tarth, Tommen Baratheon, Olenna Tyrell, Stannis Baratheon, and Aerys Targaryen.

William Magunga.

This isn’t the first time Magunga is causing us excitement. Last year, The New Yorker profiled his bookstore, The Magunga Bookstore, which is modeled on the Guardian’s online bookstore. But even before that, in 2014, we published his beautiful story of an artist in Nairobi.

Kenya will be voting on 8 August and recently had a presidential debate. See all the characters and the politicians they’ve been matched with, and a little highlighting of their shared character.

Ned Stark – Tom Mboya

(Poor thing. Too honourable to a fault. Could not play the Game of Thrones. Loved, gone, but not forgotten).

Little Finger – William Ruto

(A nobody who became somebody through sheer manipulation. Also, greed for land. Now very powerful at the top).

Tywin – Biwott

(R U T H L E S S N E S S).

Robert Baratheon – Kibaki

(Removes the Mad King from the Iron Throne).

Brienne of Tarth – Martha Karua

(Stong. Extremely loyal. Unwavering is a predominantly male space. Men cower in her presence. When battle comes, you want her fighting for you).

Tommen – Uhuru

(Last born child given the throne. Did not really want it, but oh well. Unable to govern. Nice at heart but adviced by evil men and women).

Olenna Tyrell – Mama Ngina

(Very powerful. Extremely Rich. No mercy).

Stannis – Raila

(Fought so hard but the throne is elusive).

Cersei – Lucy Baks

(The Mad Queen).

Moi – Aerys

(The Mad King).

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About Otosirieze Obi-Young

View all posts by Otosirieze Obi-Young
Otosirieze Obi-Young is Deputy Editor of Brittle Paper. He is a judge for the 2018/19 Gerald Kraak Prize and the 2019 Miles Morland Writing Scholarships. He is an editor at 14, Nigeria’s first queer art collective, which has published volumes including We Are Flowers (2017) and The Inward Gaze (2018). He is the curator of the Art Naija Series, a sequence of e-anthologies of writing and visual art focusing on different aspects of Nigerianness, including Enter Naija: The Book of Places (2016), which explores cities, and Work Naija: The Book of Vocations (2017), which explores professions. His fiction has appeared in The Threepenny Review and Transition. He has completed a collection of short stories, You Sing of a Longing, is working on a novel, and is represented by David Godwin Associates literary agency. He attended the University of Nigeria, Nsukka, where he got an M.A. in African Studies and a combined honours B.A. in History & International Studies and English & Literary Studies. He taught English at Godfrey Okoye University, Enugu. Find him at otosirieze.com, where he accepts writing and editing offers, or on Instagram or Twitter: @otosirieze. When bored, he Googles Rihanna.

One Response to “PHOTOS | Magunga Williams Compares Kenyan Politicians to Game of Thrones Characters” Subscribe

  1. tv-maniak.pl August 22, 2018 at 6:13 pm #

    You can certainly see your enthusiasm within the article you write.

    The sector hopes for more passionate writers like you who aren’t afraid to mention how they believe.
    At all times follow your heart.

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