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Boloebi Okah

I first saw him in a music video. Something about his face struck me, and I was transfixed. For the rest of the day, I couldn’t get the image of that young man out of my head. Then I opened the pages of a newspaper about two weeks later, and there was an interview featuring him. I read the interview several times, made a note of his name, then tore it out of the paper, and hid it in my school backpack, in-between my secondary school textbooks.

I skipped my afternoon classes and set off to find him, one day when I had gathered enough courage. I had a vague idea where his recording studio was, and I took some extra transport fare, just in case. I didn’t have a clear idea of what I would say, I just wanted to see him. After getting lost three times, I finally located the studio in the hustling and bustling streets of Ikeja. I walked up to the reception and asked to see him. The receptionist eyed me up and down. She was probably assuming that I was one of his young, misguided fans and she snapped at me and said he wasn’t around. I begged and pleaded with her, just to give me a couple of minutes to explain my mission. She refused, and threatened to call the security guards.

“But I’m his sister!” I said, stamping my feet and trying to stop the tears forming in my eyes.

She stopped talking for a second and looked at me closely. Then she picked up her telephone and chatted to someone. Five minutes later, I was ushered into another reception room and asked to wait.

He came out himself and ran to give me a hug. With tears in his eyes, he told me the whole story. I was born when he was in his early teens. He was a rebel, the black sheep and outcast, because he had refused to study to become a medical doctor. Instead, when he was seventeen, he ran away and by the time I was old enough to understand, he had been erased from our family life. We decided to keep our meeting a secret.

The next week, my parents pretended they didn’t know what I was talking about when I asked them why the young man playing the saxophone on the television looked so much like Father. I smiled, and decided, I was going to be a rebel too.

—————————————————————————

Tolulope Popoola is a Nigerian novelist. Her debut novel, titled Nothing Comes Close, is available on amazon. Ms. Popoola blogs at On Writing and Life.

Tolulope Popoola

I hold a doctorate in English from Duke University and recently joined the Marquette University English faculty as an Assistant Professor. I love teaching African fiction and contemporary British novels. Brittle Paper is the virtual space/station where I play and experiment with ideas on how to reinvent African fiction and literary culture.

8 Responses to “Because of Him by Tolulope Popoola” Subscribe

  1. Mohammed May 7, 2013 at 12:41 pm #

    engaging,simply ,which makes difficult to write . loved it .

  2. Bruce UGIOMOH May 8, 2013 at 10:44 am #

    Absolutely brilliant! Tolu, you know how to spin a yarn…I’ll buy the book

  3. Flash Fiction GH May 10, 2013 at 1:27 pm #

    Beautiful writing as always from Mrs. Popoola.

  4. Martha May 10, 2013 at 2:15 pm #

    Good, read! Thanks for the short moment of excitement!

  5. Sanusi May 13, 2013 at 8:47 am #

    Interesting and captivating! Beautiful close. Will take time to look for more of her writings.

  6. debby baro May 18, 2013 at 7:40 pm #

    Very engaging like every of her writings. I enjoyed it and just imagined the flow and relief it brought at the end. Nice one!

  7. Brie-Ashley July 5, 2013 at 10:10 am #

    Wow, this is simply amazing!..Interesting writings..

  8. Raheemah October 5, 2017 at 9:52 am #

    This is simply brilliant. I need to learn how to write flash fiction from you, Tolu.

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